FAQ's

Q: Which art lesson should I start with?

  • If you are just beginning to learn to draw, no matter what your age, we suggest you begin with Level I's Simple Lines (It’s free!).  It will introduce you to our approach to drawing, which is to see the simple lines that we find in the world around us, and to use them to draw complex objects.
  • Then try The Czech Cat, another free art lesson in Level I, to see how the lessons work.  If these lessons are giving you an interesting challenge, continue with Level I lessons. When you feel ready to advance to a more challenging level, do so.

 

Q: What is the difference between the five levels of art lessons?

  • Each level builds on skills developed in the previous level, so each level is more difficult and more time-consuming than the previous one.
  • Level I art lessons are suitable for students in grades 1 through adult. Some, like The Czech Cat, are suitable for kindergarteners. If you are a beginner in art - no matter what age - start with Level I.
  • Level II lessons are intended primarily for students in grades 3 through adult who have mastered skills introduced in Level I.
  • Level III lessons are aimed primarily at students in grade 5 or 6 through adult who have mastered skills introduced in Level II.
  • Level IV lessons are aimed primarily at students in grades 6 and above who have mastered skills introduced in Level III.
  • Level V lessons are aimed primarily at students in grades 7 and above who have mastered skills introduced in Level IV.

 

Q: What is the format of the art lessons?

  • Except for a few lessons, the art lessons are offered both in PowerPoint and video format. Each format has its own advantage. Powerpoint versions of the art lessons give students complete control of the pace of the lesson, while video versions allow students better opportunities to watch demonstrations of techniques.
  • Most lessons also include downloadable printouts: a warmup and a sample drawing of the subject of the lesson.

 

Q: What technology do I need for these lessons?

  • You can view the lessons on a computer screen or a tablet. If a group is using the lessons, you can project them onto a screen.

 

Q: How much time does it take to complete a lesson?

  • Lessons last from 40 minutes in Level I to as much as a few hours in Level V. The estimated time it will take to complete a lesson can be found on the Lesson Description page for each lesson.
  • Lessons are divided into parts so that you can complete part of a lesson at a time.  For example, you might end at the guided drawing on one day, and in the next lesson, you could add coloring.

 

Q: Why is it important to do the relaxation exercise?

  • It is useful for quieting our mind, shifting out of analytical thought and into visual/spatial thought, and more, but to get the full explanation, please click here.

 

Q: Why should I use permanent black magic markers for a drawing lesson?

  • Using a permanent marker does two things for the beginning artist. It will teach you to draw bold lines, and to commit to those lines instead of erasing them.
  • The permanent marker doesn’t bleed when you use washable markers or other water-based media to color the drawing later.

 

Q: Must I use the materials that are specified in the art lesson?

  • For best results, use the materials that are specified.
  • However, if you do not have the materials on hand and need to substitute, feel free to do so.  Of course, your finished artwork will look different from the examples shown, but if you are happy with the results, so are we!

 

Q: Where can I get art supplies?

  • A list of supplies and where to find them can be found here.
  • For ordinary paper and laser gloss printing paper, go to your local office supply company.
  • For all other art supplies, we have made it convenient and economical for you to find art supplies and order from Amazon.com.  Of course, if you prefer a local supplier for your art supplies, use the local supplier.

 

Q: Why should I play music while doing an art lesson?

  • Music helps students relax, helps them work in silence, and promotes the visual thinking that drawing requires.

 

Q: What music should I use for these art lessons?

  • Quiet music that remains fairly consistent in volume and tempo is best for keeping students’ minds focused on the lesson.
  • It is also best to use music without vocals, since language, spoken or sung, tends to distract us from the drawing process.
  • You can find music that has these qualities and that has been specially composed for these lessons here.

 

Q: Are there special techniques to follow when teaching an art lesson?

  • Yes, there are, but they aren’t difficult!  We’ve put together a list of tips on a separate page called “Tips for Teachers.”

Q: Which art lesson should I start with?

  • If you are just beginning to learn to draw, no matter what your age, we suggest you begin with Level I's Simple Lines (It’s free!).  It will introduce you to our approach to drawing, which is to see the simple lines that we find in the world around us, and to use them to draw complex objects.
  • Then try The Czech Cat, another free art lesson in Level I, to see how the lessons work.  If these lessons are giving you an interesting challenge, continue with Level I lessons. When you feel ready to advance to a more challenging level, do so.

 

Q: What is the difference between the five levels of art lessons?

  • Each level builds on skills developed in the previous level, so each level is more difficult and more time-consuming than the previous one.
  • Level I art lessons are suitable for students in grades 1 through adult. Some, like The Czech Cat, are suitable for kindergarteners. If you are a beginner in art - no matter what age - start with Level I.
  • Level II lessons are intended primarily for students in grades 3 through adult who have mastered skills introduced in Level I.
  • Level III lessons are aimed primarily at students in grade 5 or 6 through adult who have mastered skills introduced in Level II.
  • Level IV lessons are aimed primarily at students in grades 6 and above who have mastered skills introduced in Level III.
  • Level V lessons are aimed primarily at students in grades 7 and above who have mastered skills introduced in Level IV.

 

Q: What is the format of the art lessons?

  • Except for a few lessons, the art lessons are offered both in PowerPoint and video format. Each format has its own advantage. Powerpoint versions of the art lessons give students complete control of the pace of the lesson, while video versions allow students better opportunities to watch demonstrations of techniques.
  • Most lessons also include downloadable printouts: a warmup and a sample drawing of the subject of the lesson.

 

Q: What technology do I need for these lessons?

  • You can view the lessons on a computer screen or a tablet. If a group is using the lessons, you can project them onto a screen.

 

Q: How much time does it take to complete a lesson?

  • Lessons last from 40 minutes in Level I to as much as a few hours in Level V. The estimated time it will take to complete a lesson can be found on the Lesson Description page for each lesson.
  • Lessons are divided into parts so that you can complete part of a lesson at a time.  For example, you might end at the guided drawing on one day, and in the next lesson, you could add coloring.

 

Q: Why is it important to do the relaxation exercise?

  • It is useful for quieting our mind, shifting out of analytical thought and into visual/spatial thought, and more, but to get the full explanation, please click here.

 

Q: Why should I use permanent black magic markers for a drawing lesson?

  • Using a permanent marker does two things for the beginning artist. It will teach you to draw bold lines, and to commit to those lines instead of erasing them.
  • The permanent marker doesn’t bleed when you use washable markers or other water-based media to color the drawing later.

 

Q: Must I use the materials that are specified in the art lesson?

  • For best results, use the materials that are specified.
  • However, if you do not have the materials on hand and need to substitute, feel free to do so.  Of course, your finished artwork will look different from the examples shown, but if you are happy with the results, so are we!

 

Q: Where can I get art supplies?

  • A list of supplies and where to find them can be found here.
  • For ordinary paper and laser gloss printing paper, go to your local office supply company.
  • For all other art supplies, we have made it convenient and economical for you to find art supplies and order from Amazon.com.  Of course, if you prefer a local supplier for your art supplies, use the local supplier.

 

Q: Why should I play music while doing an art lesson?

  • Music helps students relax, helps them work in silence, and promotes the visual thinking that drawing requires.

 

Q: What music should I use for these art lessons?

  • Quiet music that remains fairly consistent in volume and tempo is best for keeping students’ minds focused on the lesson.
  • It is also best to use music without vocals, since language, spoken or sung, tends to distract us from the drawing process.
  • You can find music that has these qualities and that has been specially composed for these lessons here.

 

Q: Are there special techniques to follow when teaching an art lesson?

  • Yes, there are, but they aren’t difficult!  We’ve put together a list of tips on a separate page called “Tips for Teachers.”

Q: Which art lesson should I start with?

  • If you are just beginning to learn to draw, no matter what your age, we suggest you begin with Level I's Simple Lines (It’s free!).  It will introduce you to our approach to drawing, which is to see the simple lines that we find in the world around us, and to use them to draw complex objects.
  • Then try The Czech Cat, another free art lesson in Level I, to see how the lessons work.  If these lessons are giving you an interesting challenge, continue with Level I lessons. When you feel ready to advance to a more challenging level, do so.

 

Q: What is the difference between the five levels of art lessons?

  • Each level builds on skills developed in the previous level, so each level is more difficult and more time-consuming than the previous one.
  • Level I art lessons are suitable for students in grades 1 through adult. Some, like The Czech Cat, are suitable for kindergarteners. If you are a beginner in art - no matter what age - start with Level I.
  • Level II lessons are intended primarily for students in grades 3 through adult who have mastered skills introduced in Level I.
  • Level III lessons are aimed primarily at students in grade 5 or 6 through adult who have mastered skills introduced in Level II.
  • Level IV lessons are aimed primarily at students in grades 6 and above who have mastered skills introduced in Level III.
  • Level V lessons are aimed primarily at students in grades 7 and above who have mastered skills introduced in Level IV.

 

Q: What is the format of the art lessons?

  • Except for a few lessons, the art lessons are offered both in PowerPoint and video format. Each format has its own advantage. Powerpoint versions of the art lessons give students complete control of the pace of the lesson, while video versions allow students better opportunities to watch demonstrations of techniques.
  • Most lessons also include downloadable printouts: a warmup and a sample drawing of the subject of the lesson.

 

Q: What technology do I need for these lessons?

  • You can view the lessons on a computer screen or a tablet. If a group is using the lessons, you can project them onto a screen.

 

Q: How much time does it take to complete a lesson?

  • Lessons last from 40 minutes in Level I to as much as a few hours in Level V. The estimated time it will take to complete a lesson can be found on the Lesson Description page for each lesson.
  • Lessons are divided into parts so that you can complete part of a lesson at a time.  For example, you might end at the guided drawing on one day, and in the next lesson, you could add coloring.

 

Q: Why is it important to do the relaxation exercise?

  • It is useful for quieting our mind, shifting out of analytical thought and into visual/spatial thought, and more, but to get the full explanation, please click here.

 

Q: Why should I use permanent black magic markers for a drawing lesson?

  • Using a permanent marker does two things for the beginning artist. It will teach you to draw bold lines, and to commit to those lines instead of erasing them.
  • The permanent marker doesn’t bleed when you use washable markers or other water-based media to color the drawing later.

 

Q: Must I use the materials that are specified in the art lesson?

  • For best results, use the materials that are specified.
  • However, if you do not have the materials on hand and need to substitute, feel free to do so.  Of course, your finished artwork will look different from the examples shown, but if you are happy with the results, so are we!

 

Q: Where can I get art supplies?

  • A list of supplies and where to find them can be found here.
  • For ordinary paper and laser gloss printing paper, go to your local office supply company.
  • For all other art supplies, we have made it convenient and economical for you to find art supplies and order from Amazon.com.  Of course, if you prefer a local supplier for your art supplies, use the local supplier.

 

Q: Why should I play music while doing an art lesson?

  • Music helps students relax, helps them work in silence, and promotes the visual thinking that drawing requires.

 

Q: What music should I use for these art lessons?

  • Quiet music that remains fairly consistent in volume and tempo is best for keeping students’ minds focused on the lesson.
  • It is also best to use music without vocals, since language, spoken or sung, tends to distract us from the drawing process.
  • You can find music that has these qualities and that has been specially composed for these lessons here.

 

Q: Are there special techniques to follow when teaching an art lesson?

  • Yes, there are, but they aren’t difficult!  We’ve put together a list of tips on a separate page called “Tips for Teachers.”